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the Muslim Aid Flamingo world cup

Campaign

Sports

Sports

The World Cup is here. Join us, for our very own Muslim Aid World Cup Fever!

Team Flamengo FC will be playing weekly World Cup matches to help raise funds to support orphans and vulnerable children around the world. Since December 2015 the squad have been travelling up and down the country to play weekly football matches with teams coming together from all faiths and backgrounds.

Here's where are matches will take place: Wadham Lodge Sports Ground, Kitchener Road, Walthamstow, London, E17 4JP

Come and show your support as we play several renowned teams such as Arsenal Fan TV, Outlawz, The Metropolitan Police Service (AMP) and many more. Let’s enjoy this World Cup together - kick a ball and change a life.

Muslim Aid World Cup Fever

Sports

Show your support by donating now. For more information email us at: maflamengo@muslimaid.org

#UnityThroughSports

  • 20 Aug 2018 update Global Safeguarding Coordinator

    Title

    Global Safeguarding Coordinator

    Employment Type

    Permanent

    Contract Type

    Full Time

    Hours per Week

    35

    Salary

    £27,000 - £34,000

    Location

    London

    Application Deadline

    16/09/2018

    Who we are

    Muslim Aid is a British, faith-based international development organisation that provides support to communities around the world affected by disasters, conflict or endemic poverty without regard to their social, religious, or ethnic background.

    What you’ll be doing:

    The post holder will be a technical lead on Safeguarding and Children Safety, delivering high quality, accessible and reliable support, guidance and capacity to emergency/humanitarian response teams, country offices and Head Quarters, in order to challenge and encourage engagement, as we further develop our Safeguarding programme, procedures and education plans.

    The post holder will oversee and manage the Safeguarding framework and tools, in order to strengthen the capabilities and knowledge of all our stakeholders, ensuring we safeguard the children and vulnerable adults we serve.

    Main responsibilities, amongst others, are as follows:

    • Establish and develop Regional and Country child safeguarding networks to support local implementation.
    • Coach and support where needed Country Focal Points and Investigation Officers to improve Child Safeguarding practice. Share learning from these experiences across the organisation. 
    • Support colleagues in Regional Programme Teams/Country Programmes to undertake risk assessments and solutions to mitigate risks
    • Ensure all incidents are appropriately documented, reported and considered.
    • Analyse trends from reporting mechanisms and provide senior management with recommendations for improvements

     

    Why you’ll be hired

    The ideal candidate will

    • Be educated to degree standard with a professional qualification in a relevant field
    • Have experience of child protection/child safeguarding practice within developing countries
    • Have experience of working with children in international development and humanitarian settings.
    • Have experience of conducting investigations in an INGO or international context
    • Have designed, facilitated and evaluated Safety and Safeguarding training in different cultural and organisational contexts.
    • Have experience of Gender, inclusion and conflict-sensitive programming
    • Have extensive experience of planning and undertaking training programmes/workshops in child protection/safeguarding at a range of levels
    • Have knowledge of Incident investigation and how to improve policy and practice in the light of findings.
    • Have knowledge of Safety and safeguarding regulations (including DBS) and application in child spaces/settings.

    To apply please submit your cover letter (no more than 1 page) and CV to Recruitment@muslimaid.org

     

  • 20 Aug 2018 update Mass exodus by British tourists after earthquakes on Lombok - but what now for the islanders left behind?

    I arrived on Lombok just 30 minutes after the last major earthquake on Thursday 9 August. There was an eerie silence at the airport and instead of backpacks and suitcases arriving at the baggage reclaim there were boxes of syringes, surgical wipes, other medical supplies and wheelbarrows.

    Three massive earthquakes in just 12 days had now hit the tropical island of Lombok, Indonesia, resulting in scenes of Western tourists losing holiday dreams, as they scrambled in panic to get onto boats and to safety. The tourists were gone but what of the islanders left behind?

    I had come to support Muslim Aid’s local team and as I left the airport, the devastation I saw was catastrophic; bridges, banks, hospitals, schools and homes have been completely decimated, some looking as if they had literally dropped to the ground, others like bombs had hit them and blown out the walls.

    The death toll has now risen to 468, more than 7,773 people have been injured and over 352,736 people have fled their homes and are now living in make-shift camps for displaced people*. Driving along, I could see camp after camp where men, women and children were living under tarpaulins.

    Two hours later I was in the village of Selad, where half of the homes had been so badly damaged they couldn’t be lived in.  The first person I met was Sufrianti, a young mother, who told me that she’d been watching TV when the earthquake came. She said: “I grabbed the baby and ran for our lives. I felt so anxious. My home has been completely demolished.”

    Many people told me that it’s cold sleeping out at night and in the day it’s boiling hot, mosquitoes are all around and there’s no privacy. There is nowhere to go to the toilet and they are dependent on other people for food and support.

    Hotels on the island are like ghost towns and stores that are open have bare shelves. There is crippling local inflation; tarpaulins have doubled in price, eggs up by 33% and chickens now cost an additional 25%.

    I spent most of the week in the north of Lombok which has been hardest-hit; Muslim Aid has developed an expertise in reaching marginalized people and those living in areas difficult to access.

    In the hidden village of Sambik Elen, I spoke to the village leader and farmer Marwi, 43, who spends his days driving around on his scooter seeking help for his villagers.

     “Almost everyone in the village is homeless. We are all traumatized and the children are suffering with nightmares and need special support. I make my living by farming rice and corn but since the earthquake the fields are cracked, covered with dust from the mountain and sulphuric water is seeping through.

    “We have had a lot of support but rice stocks are again low…we have enough rice for today and tomorrow … but I’m worried that my villagers will soon be starving.”

    Excited children greeted us as we arrived in a small, overcrowded camp in Sesele, with a distribution of eggs, noodles, sanitary towels, nappies, water and rice . I was soon introduced to Atun, and her three day old baby. Atun, 32, had given birth just minutes before the last earthquake, the day I arrived . She wept as she relayed her story.

    “I was worried that there might be another earthquake and I knew my baby was on its way. I was in pain, I couldn’t go to the toilet. I was worried and tried to make it come faster. When my husband and I arrived at the health centre there were no medical staff there – the baby came out on its own. The nurse came later.

    “Then the third earthquake struck. My husband and I ran out and the nurse ran carrying our baby. I had no feelings – I left everything to God. The baby is healthy, but I feel so sad now because when my other children were born I could take them home, but I’ve had to bring this baby to the camp. I don’t have enough food and my milk is running out. Everyone feels sad here. Our homes are destroyed and we have nothing to go back to.”

    I saw people washing their pots and clothes in the river in Sesele and I was told that the same river water was being used as a toilet by the hundreds camped around. The need to build latrines is vital now, as cholera and diarrhoea could bring more disaster to these families.

    We walked through a cow shed, now home to many, and I was immediately struck by the wide smile of Ahmad Isnaini, a 39-year-old teacher. Ahmad told me how at the time of the last earthquake he and his wife Sri Handiyani, 35, had been playing outside with their children;  Mohammed el Watun, 4, and Intan, 10.

    He invited me into their section, the straw now covered with a mat and a piece of cloth had been pinned up to keep out the blazing sun. When I asked how he could stay smiling he said: “I’m still alive and so is my family.”

    “My mother, who is 90 years-old, was in the house as it collapsed around her.

    We carried her out and luckily she wasn’t hurt. Now we are living in this cow shed and I don’t know what’s going to happen. I’m still traumatised. If we hear a loud noise we all feel frightened.”



    He took me to see what remained of their home. The side of the house had collapsed revealing their belongings; books, broken furniture and their daughter’s pink rucksack lay between piles of rubble.

    Muslim Aid is working with local organisation Yayasan Kemanusiaan Muslim Indonesia (YKMI) and coordinating with local and national government agencies’ disaster management systems. But there is much to be done. Immediately food, water and shelter are vital to sustain lives and in the long-term water points, latrines, hospitals and schools need to be repaired and rebuilt.

    The island is naturally beautiful – lush vegetation, mountains and the bluest of seas. One day the tourists will be back.  But, it’s going to take years for these resilient people to recover and my concern is for the more vulnerable people; the old, the disabled, the orphans and the many who are very poor – these are the people we need to support.

    [* Statistics: latest from National Disaster Management Authority as on 14 August]

    Inside one of the camps in the village of Selad
    • Inside one of the camps in the village of Selad
    • Atun with her three day old baby
    • Ahmad looking at his damaged home
  • 17 Aug 2018 update Head of Legal & Compliance

    Title

    Head of Legal & Compliance

    Employment Type

    Permanent

    Contract Type

    Full Time

    Hours per Week

    35

    Salary

    £46,000-£60,000

    Location

    London

    Application Deadline

    31/08/2018

    What you will be doing

    The Head of Legal & Compliance will build and lead the legal, risk and compliance function on behalf of Muslim Aid providing leadership and supervision to the team and their work.  The Head of Legal & Compliance will drive the internal processes to ensure the wider organisation is following best practice in good governance, risk management and compliance.

    Since this is a new department, the role holder will have the opportunity to design and build the department from scratch and take responsibility for a wide remit including good governance, regulatory compliance, procurement and logistics, due diligence, legal, intellectual property, safeguarding, GDPR and overall organisational compliance.

    See the Job Description for the full remit of the role.

    Why you’ll be hired:

    The successful candidate will hold a relevant degree or equivalent and be a lawyer qualified in England and Wales. You will have a minimum 5+ years experience at a senior level, a particular knowledge of GDPR and data protection, strong experience of leading an internal team, experience of business control and international exposure.

    You will have the ability to work effectively at both strategic and operational levels and the ability to travel and work overseas in testing conditions and environments. You will also be highly skilled in evaluating risk and use of risk analysis techniques

    To apply, please submit your CV and cover letter (no more than 1 page) to recruitment@muslimaid.org

  • 17 Aug 2018 update Supporter Experience Officer

    Title

    Supporter Experience Officer

    Employment Type

    Permanent

    Contract Type

    Full Time

    Hours per Week

    35

    Salary

    £20,000-£27,000

    Location

    London

    Application Deadline

    02/09/2018

    Who we are

    Muslim Aid is a British, faith-based international development organisation that provides support to communities around the world affected by disasters, conflict or endemic poverty without regard to their social, religious, or ethnic background.

    What you’ll be doing:

    Supporter Experience Team is involved in the planning and development of the programme that puts the supporter experience at the heart of everything they do as well as increase the depth and value of supporter relationships whilst encouraging repeat giving or multiple interactions. This will entail work on mailed, e-appeals and telemarketing.

    The team plays a pivotal role in making Muslim Aid more data and insight driven in the way we fundraise and communicate with supporters. The team will take a lead in mapping supporter journeys by using a data driven methodology to ensure we are implementing insights to improve the way we engage with our supporters.

    Working within the Supporter Experience Team, the purpose of this role is to design and implement first class stewardship plans to ensure our amazing supporters have a great experience with Muslim Aid and care about the cause for many years.

    As a confident communicator, you will help develop a culture based on understanding and interpreting supporter behaviours and motivations. Using this information, you will lead on mapping journeys and experiences across communications, campaigns and the fundraising portfolio to maximise a supporter’s lifetime value.

    Why you’ll be hired

    The ideal candidate will be IT literate - proficient with Word, Excel and Outlook and will have significant supporter/customer care experience obtained from the commercial or charity sectors. You will have experience of working in a busy environment, prioritising activities appropriately and managing multiple, conflicting priorities.

    You will also have proven experience of developing internal relationships across a complex organisation – working with internal clients to develop and adapt briefs to improve supporter experience.

    To apply please submit your cover letter (no more than 1 page) and CV to Recruitment@muslimaid.org

  • 17 Aug 2018 update Our Programme Manager tells us about his experience with Muslim Aid in Lombok

    Following the devastating earthquakes on Lombok, Indonesia, Muslim Aid, with our local partner YKMI, has launched an appeal to help the thousands of local people now displaced across the island.

    Fadlullah Wilmot, Regional Programme Manager for Muslim Aid tell us more about their work on the ground responding to this emergency.

    “I was in the Lombok office last Thursday when the third earthquake struck. The whole building shook, there was a huge noise and we all ran out into the road, leaving everything behind. I really felt  everything was going to collapse before we could get out. It was really sudden. 

    “Seeing the terrible destruction all around makes you realise how transient and impermanent everything is. We think of our own concerns of being of overriding importance and then you realise that your concerns compared to people in the field who have lost everything are really very insignificant. 

    “Then you think what can we do to support these people so that we can help them return to their life as it was before, or if possible, better than before.

    “More than 300,000 people have fled their homes and are now living in the open air just covered by tarpaulins, with mosquitoes all around. They have nowhere to go to the toilet, dependent on other people for food and support; it’s a very difficult situation for people to have to live in. And the important thing is how we can help people in a way that maintains their dignity.



    “Muslim Aid is a humanitarian organisation and has been active in Indonesia since the tsunami. We have always had a strong emphasis all over the world on emergency relief although in recent years we have focused on long term development work.  In Lombok Muslim Aid has been working with communities to help provide access to clean water, helping to build latrines, and importantly training people on disaster risk prevention.

    “Right now on Lombok the priority has been to save lives;  so you need medical support and you need rescue people. We have to ensure there is clean drinking water available, enough food and that there is some basic shelter for people.



    “I am very impressed with the Indonesian government's response; at a recent coordination meeting I attended I learnt that the Head of the Disaster Management had asked for all 436 schools that have been damaged to have temporary classrooms within 2 weeks so that children can be back at school and for one one temporary hospital to be up and running.

    “The government regards the support from local NGOs as important because the government can’t do everything, so they appreciate the work of NGOs. The need is great and it’s vital that everyone pitches in. And Muslim Aid in Indonesia is working through its local partner YKMI. 

    “Muslim Aid has been supplying tarpaulins, ropes, mats and blankets to help people have shelter, ready to eat food, including baby food, drinking water, hygiene kits (shampoo, soap, toothpaste) nappies and sanitary towels.

    Fadlullah delivering aid to village leader at Sesele village

    Fadlullah delivering aid to village leader at Sesele village

    “The next phase will be to strengthen the capacity to help rebuild their lives – that is the most important thing. And identifying individuals or communities that need that extra level of support, including widows, vulnerable adults, disabled people and orphans. The need to build latrines is really important as going round we saw that people are  having to use the same river water to go to the toilet and wash their clothes so the results could be disastrous causing diarrhoea and cholera. Also we have met many, many people who are severely traumatised so psycho-social support is really necessary.  A number of our staff and volunteers have been trained in trauma counselling. 

    “Muslim Aid has developed an expertise all over the world in reaching marginalised people, and people living in areas which are difficult to access. A lot of our work here is being done by local community volunteers who we have trained over the years – this model is helping us to reach many more people.

    “The tourists will come back as it’s such a beautiful place and in the long term the majority of people will be able to recover, they are resilient. But there will be pockets of people who are left out who don’t have the capacity because they are old, disabled or just too poor and those are the people we need to identify and help.”

    Children with aid at a camp in Sesele
    • Children with aid at a camp in Sesele
    • Fadlullah delivering aid to village leader at Sesele village
    • Women and babies in the camps Selad village Lombok
    • 90 year-old lady