Today • Islamic Date -

Next Prayer: London -

Recent Donations -

Muslim Aid Media Centre

On the night of Laylat Al-Qadr, we bask ourselves in different forms of worship, such as reciting the Quran, making dua, giving charity, and observing voluntary prayers. 

Journal prompts to help you heal your heart as we approach Laylat Al-Qadr

Journal prompts to help you heal your heart as we approach Laylat Al-Qadr

On the night of Laylat Al-Qadr, we bask ourselves in different forms of worship, such as reciting the Quran, making dua, giving charity, and observing voluntary prayers.

Even though the exact night of Laylat Al-Qadr isn’t known, on the 27th of Ramadan, mosques hold special congregational prayers throughout the night, and some Muslims spend the entire night in worship and contemplation on the love of the Divine.

This night is so holy that angels descend to the earth and the gates of heaven are opened to accept the prayers of those who seek forgiveness and guidance, so we must make the most of this blessed night.

With a powerful night comes powerful preparation. Imam Ghazali once said: “Know that the key to knowing God is to know your own self.” We’ve heard this quote a lot, but what does it mean?

Imam Al-Ghazali was, at large, referring to our subconscious mind and the state of our hearts. So, as we get closer to understanding our world view through our hardwired subconscious beliefs (which can be healed, changed and alchemised once we recognise them), traumas, childhood and state of our heart.

Sometimes it’s hard for us to believe Allah will answer our duas because we essentially don’t feel worthy of it. For example, if someone has been praying to get married but doesn’t believe their dua will be answered because subconsciously they don’t feel worthy of marriage. Where did their limitations surrounding love begin? Was it in childhood when their parents didn’t have time for them, and they felt unworthy of love and attention? Was it because they saw dysfunctional relationships around them and as adults, they associate love with dysfunction?

All these subconscious thoughts directly impact our relationship with Allah because they how much of Allah’s endless mercy we believe we’re worthy of receiving.

Allah’s love overrides everything, but it’s our duty to tap into his love and mercy by taking responsibility for our perceptions and allowing healing to be part of our journey in becoming stronger, healthier and better Muslims.

After all, in a Hadith Qudsi, our beloved Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) said: ‘Allah says: 'I am just as My servant thinks I am, (i.e. I am able to do for him what he thinks I can do for him) and I am with him if He remembers Me’ (Abu Hurairah). This means our perception of Allah directly impacts our relationship with Him.

With the intention of getting closer to Allah and understanding our own beliefs to his perception, here are some journal prompts to help you prepare your heart to connect away for Laylat Al-Qadr.

  1. What do I want in this life and the next?
  2. Where do I feel unworthy of receiving what I want?
  3. What are the underlying emotions I want to feel when I get what I’m praying for (peace, love, success, happiness, contentment)?
  4. What am I doing to get what I want?
  5. When was the first time I felt unworthy of feeling the emotions behind the way I’d feel when I get what I want? (ie: when did I first feel unworthy of feeling loved/at peace?) Write a story from your childhood.
  6. Who do I need to forgive to release these subconscious blocks?

For the sixth prompt, you need to remember that forgiveness is a process and you need to go through stages of forgiveness before you can let go:

  1. Acknowledging and validating the pain
  2. Feel your feelings without judgement (writing a letter to the person who wronged you helps)
  3. Accepting that you can’t change the past
  4. Deciding that you can change your future by letting go if you’re ready to forgive
  5. Repairing the past by writing a letter to your younger self
  6. Learning how forgiveness benefits you and why you need to let go of old energy holding you back
  7. Making the step to forgive others as we ask Allah to forgive them and forgive ourselves

As with any type of healing, forgiveness isn’t a linear process, and you may find yourself starting the forgiveness journey but not finishing it in time for Laylat Al-Qadr. The aim isn’t completion, these exercises take you on a journey and help you trust that Allah to carry you through it as you self-reflect and utilise resources like coaches, therapists, community, etc.

We heal to master ourselves. With self-mastery comes the discipline, gentleness and love that we experience in flow state. When we release our fight-or-flight responses and can be fully present, we find it so much easier to connect to Allah.

Your mental health matters during Ramadan and you can and should use it as a tool to increase your Ibadah.

Don’t miss Laylat al-Qadr, set up auto-donate now

The last ten nights of Ramadan are believed to be the most important of the holy month, as this is when the Prophet Mohammad (PBUH) received the first verses of the Qur’an. This is remembered today through zakat donations being spread across the final ten nights, including Laylat-al-Qadr donations for additional rewards in the Hereafter.

If you are interested in setting up your donation to be spread across the Last Ten Nights, ensuring your rewards, we are here to help.

This year, My Ten Nights allows you to split your Zakat and Sadaqah across the last ten nights – so you never miss giving on Laylat ul Qadr again.

We are a faith-based British international charity that provides help to people who are victims of natural disasters or conflict or suffering from poverty, hunger, disease, homelessness, injustice, deprivation or lack of skills and economic opportunities.

020 7377 4200

Ways to Donate

Donate


  • Living Wage
  • Zakat Policy
  • Registered with

    Fundraising Regulator

Please support us further

Your donation will provide help to people who are victims of natural disasters or conflict or suffering from poverty, hunger, disease, homelessness, injustice, deprivation or lack of skills and economic opportunities.